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Foreign Policy Analysis
Commission Meeting November 4, 2019

Commission Meeting November 4, 2019


[INTERPOSING VOICES] GENE MCKOWN: I’d like to call
this meeting to order two minutes early. DON FREYMILLER: Well, yeah,
that gives you two minutes [AUDIO OUT]. [GAVEL BANGING] GENE MCKOWN: Thank you. If everyone will grab a
chair I will officially call this meeting to order,
and we have three guests today. Representative Ronnie Johns. Glad to have you with us today. Secretary Gary Ridley,
and Mike Patterson. Thank you, Mike. And Bobby Stem, ACG. AGC. Get that right the first time. All right, we now
have the roll call. We’ll start the meeting. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Coburn. BOB COBURN: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Grimsley. JAMES GRIMSLEY: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Freymiller. DON FREYMILLER: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Shannon. TW SHANNON: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. McKown. GENE MCKOWN: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Dyson. DAVID DYSON: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Alexander. BOBBY ALEXANDER: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. LaForge. STEVE LAFORGE: Here. SUBJECT 1: Mr. Peterson. BOB PETERSON: Here. GENE MCKOWN: I need a
motion for the approval of the minutes of the October
Transportation Committee meeting. JAMES GRIMSLEY: I make
a motion to approve. BOBBY ALEXANDER: Second. GENE MCKOWN: Second. All in favor? Motion carries. Mr. chairman, we have
the consent docket. It contains items
number 151 and 152. These items were discussed
in detail in our committee meetings this morning. Any of the commissioners want
to pull any of the items, or discuss any
items that may have been on the consent docket? Otherwise, I hear a motion for
the approval of the consent docket– Move to be approved. DAVID DYSON: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor. BOB PETERSON: What
are we approving? 151? STEVE LAFORGE: And 2. BOB PETERSON: And 2? OK. STEVE LAFORGE: The
consent docket. BOB PETERSON: OK. GENE MCKOWN: Item number 153. DON FREYMILLER: [INAUDIBLE] GENE MCKOWN: Do what? SUBJECT 2: Good
morning, Mr. chairman, members of the commission. Item 153. I have one programming
item this month. It’s Cleveland County. We’re requesting to repair
vehicle impact damage to Indian Hills Road over I-35. The estimated cost of
the project is $50,000, and it can be ready for
a February 2020 letting. The party responsible for
the damage is unknown. Approval is recommended, and
I’ll answer any questions if you have any. TW SHANNON: I make
a motion to approve. GENE MCKOWN: Do I hear a second? BOB PETERSON: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor? SUBJECT 2: OK. GENE MCKOWN: [INAUDIBLE] SUBJECT 2: OK item
154, our engineering contract supplements. This month I have four of those. Part A is our statewide, all
districts, on-demand land surveying. Previously we selected
six consulting firms to provide this land serving. Carol Surveying and Mapping,
CEC Corporation, Frontier Land Surveying, Heartland
Surveying and Mapping, Keystone Engineering
and Land Surveying, and White Hawk
Engineering and Design. Total aggregate increase for
this supplement and contracts for these six is $1,800,000. Part B is Kay County,
commissioned district 4. We previously authorized
Atkins North America to prepare our final design
plans for State Highway 11 over an abandoned railroad. The supplement not to
exceed amount is $73,014, and I want to direct your
attention to the summary in the front of your packet. It says $73,104. The correct number is $73,014. That’s in the specific item. Anyway, this project is in
the eight year construction work plan with a schedule let
date of federal fiscal year 2027. Part C in Custer County. This is in district 5. We’ve previously authorized
Atkins North America to do the final design
plans for State Highway 33. This supplement not to
exceed amount is $138,227. The project is in the
eight year construction work plan with a schedule let
date in federal fiscal year 2023. And, finally, Part
D in Custer County in commissioned
district 5 we previously authorized Garver to
do the final design plans for I-40 interchange
and intersection modification at exit 65. The supplement not to
exceed amount is $673,147. This project is also in
the eight year construction work plan scheduled for
federal fiscal year 2024, and approval is recommended. I’ll try to answer any questions
if you have any this morning. BOB PETERSON: This is probably
totally inconsequential, but why do we reference federal
fiscal year instead of state fiscal year? SUBJECT 2: Funding for
the federal funding. BOB PETERSON: Is
this all federal? These are all federally funded? SUBJECT 2: Typically
they’re federally funded unless they’re
on-demand contracts, then we’ll usually
use state funds. BOB PETERSON: OK. SUBJECT 2: Typically. BOB PETERSON: All
right, thank you. SUBJECT 2: Mhm. GENE MCKOWN: Any
other questions? You’ve heard the presentation. Do I hear a motion? DAVID DYSON: So moved. JAMES GRIMSLEY: Second. GENE MCKOWN: Second. All in favor? Thank you very much. SUBJECT 2: Thank you. GENE MCKOWN: Item number 155. JOHN LEONARD: Mr. chairman,
members of the commission, I’d like to present
item 155 parts A through double G. These
are change orders on projects which have a cumulative total
of change orders of $75,000 or less. This item is presented
for your information only. No action is
necessary, but I’d be glad to answer any questions. GENE MCKOWN: Any questions
from any of the commissioners? Would you proceed to number 156? JOHN LEONARD: right, item 156. Signing parts A
through double G. These are change
orders on projects which have a cumulative
total greater than $75,000. Your approval is
recommended, and I would be glad to answer any questions. GENE MCKOWN: Do I
hear any questions? All in favor? Let’s see. I need a motion for
approval on that, don’t I? STEVE LAFORGE: I make a motion
to approve item 155 and 156. TW SHANNON: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor? Vote. Thank you, Mr. Leonard. Number 157 is the letting. Mrs. Hilmes, you’re
recognized to present. Thank you. CHELLEY HILMES:
Good morning, Mr. chairman, members
of the commission. Agenda item 157 is for
the proposed bid openings for the final January 2020
and the tentative February and tentative March. The department
requests and recommends approval of this item. GENE MCKOWN: You’ve
heard the presentation. Do I have a motion? BOBBY ALEXANDER: [INAUDIBLE] JAMES GRIMSLEY: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor? Thank you. That was 157. Oh, OK. Excuse me. Miss Willams, if you will. CHARM WILLAMS: Good
morning Mr. chairman, members of the commission. Agenda item 158, settlement
for damages to state property. The department
recommends and requests approval of the
settlement offer. GENE MCKOWN: Any questions? BOB PETERSON: I make
a motion to accept. TW SHANNON: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor? Thank you. Item number 159. ANTHONY DELCE: Good morning
commissioners, Mr. chairman. Item 159, our recommendation
for the October 17 bid opening. It is recommended that the
following items recognized by call order be awarded. It’s call orders 110, 115, 125,
130, 135, 140 145, 150, 160, 170, 200, 210, 220, 235, 240,
250 270, 280, 281, 286, 290, 300, 305, 330, 340,
350, 360, and 370. It is recommended that
the following items from the October 17 bid opening
referred to by call order be rejected. As called orders 145, 175,
190, 230, 284, 285, 310, 320, and 380. This includes our
recommendations for award, and your approval is requested. BOB PETERSON: Did
you say 145 or 147? ANTHONY DELCE: 147. BOB PETERSON: Yeah, OK. ANTHONY DELCE: I apologize
if I said otherwise. GENE MCKOWN: You’ve
heard the presentation. Are there any questions? Do I hear a motion for approval? JAMES GRIMSLEY: I
move for approval. GENE MCKOWN: Second? DAVID DYSON: Second. ANTHONY DELCE: Thank
you, commissioner. GENE MCKOWN: Thank
you very much. Item number 160 is a
emergency declaration along with item number
163, which is an addendum. And, Mr. secretary, can
those be voted on one, or do we need to vote
on them separate? OK. TIM GATZ: Mr. Chairman,
commissioners, item 160 is a
declaration of emergency due to the record flooding
on Sunday, October 6. It was necessary
for the department to close the subject bridge. The flooding caused
significant damage, undermining under the south
side of the east abutment and approach lab. The fill under the north side of
the east abutment and approach appears to be intact. Division 8 was unable to open
the bridge on the north side to one line of– excuse me. Was able to open the
bridge on the north side to one lane of traffic
with signalization. Currently permit loads are
restricted from this structure. The department forces do not
have the capability required to make the bridge repairs. On October 9 of 2019, under
the authority of title 61 subsection 130 and the authority
provided in commission rules, I issued my declaration
that an emergency exists which impairs the safety
of the traveling public, and I authorized the department
to issue an emergency contract for repairing the
bridge damage, including all associated traffic costs. The estimated bridge
repair cost was $500,000, which includes traffic work. Work anticipated to begin
at 8:00 AM on November 6, and should be substantially
completed on November 26. Subsequent to that we have
a bid on that structure that came in excess of. Therefore, in order
to award that bridge, I believe we’ve got
a recommendation. And Anthony, if you
want to come forward. Mr. chairman, if you might,
with a recommendation for award of this contract. GENE MCKOWN: OK. ANTHONY DELCE:
Thank you, director. Again, I’ll read our
recommendation in the record. On October 9 the audit
director declared an emergency on State Highway 20
over Spavinaw Creek and in Mayes County due
to the October 6 flooding. An emergency bid opening
was held on October 31 with the intent of
entering into a contract with a local contractor
to repair the bridge. The engineer’s estimate for
the project was $661,875. The low bid submitted by
Manhattan Road and Bridge was $978,000. The low bid exceeds the
audit director’s authority for approval. The bid, however, has been
reviewed by the department, and has been deemed to be
reasonable and appropriate for the scope of work. The department therefore
brings this item to the commission
with a recommendation that the low bid be awarded. Your approval is requested. GENE MCKOWN: Let me
ask you a question. Do I need two votes? Do I need a vote on– ANTHONY DELCE:
It’s a single vote. GENE MCKOWN: — for
your presentation. TIM GATZ: Mr. chairman, based
on my declaration of emergency and the estimate
at that time, we would not have required
a vote because that would be within my authority
to declare an emergency. However, because the
ultimate bidding process yielded a bid amount that was
in excess of my authority, now we need commission
approval to award the bid. GENE MCKOWN: OK, I
just want to make sure. TIM GATZ: Yes, sir. BOBBY ALEXANDER: [INAUDIBLE]
was just voting on 163. TIM GATZ: Yes, sir. GENE MCKOWN: You’ve
heard the information. Are there any questions? We had some pictures of that. That’s quite amazing
the damage it was done. Do I hear a motion? BOB PETERSON: Motion to accept. BOBBY ALEXANDER: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor? TIM GATZ: Thank you
again, commissioner. GENE MCKOWN: Thank you. At this time we’ll hear
our director’s report. TIM GATZ: Mr. Chairman,
commissioners, recently you’ve heard a couple of things
discussed maybe in the media as some new law went into
effect on November 1. The first is a move-over law,
and what that law requires is based on Senate Bill 89,
and it requires motorists approaching all stationary
vehicles displaying flashing lights to move
over into a lane that is not adjacent to the vehicle. This applies to
highways and interstates with two or more lanes of
travel in each direction, and the law updates
prior legislation that required motorists to move
over for first responders, law enforcement, and
now it basically applies to all vehicles
if they’re displaying their flashing lights. Again, I think the traveling
public in most instances tries to provide that latitude,
but it wasn’t a bad idea to go ahead and put this
into the Motor Vehicle Code and update that statute. And that’s what this does,
and that is in effect now. The second law is
House Bill 1071, which authorized
potential speed limit increases on rural
interstates and turnpikes, and again that went into
effect on November 1. It does not mandate those
speed limit increases. Both ODOT and the Oklahoma
Turnpike Authority are performing required studies
to consider speed limit changes as outlined by statute,
and the studies include elements of design
such as roadway geometry, sight distances, traffic
volumes, accident studies, and really what the
traffic is doing out there on those facilities right now. Again, those
studies are ongoing. We expect those to complete
sometime after the first year. The department will
complete our analysis, our traffic engineers will
bring back some recommendations, and as always we’re very mindful
of the safety of the traveling public. That is our number one
priority and, again, we’re going to take a really hard
look at the speed studies that we’re doing out
there on the highways to make sure that before we
bring your recommendation forward to the commission
that it makes sense from a public safety standpoint. And we expect that
to happen sometime after the first of the year, so,
again, we started those studies in advance of November
1, so we didn’t wait for the law to go into effect. That work is ongoing,
but the numbers will have to be crunched,
and we’re really going to take a hard look
at making sure that we’re doing something that’s safe. Also, the department recently
hosted the Oklahoma Bike Summit here at the agency. This year that partnership
with Bike Oklahoma was a two-day event, one day
here at the ODOT commission room, and it really was
focused on bike and pedestrian advocates and bringing them
together with our engineers and planners to really
advocate and understand the safety needs out there
of all different modes of transportation. And we had a good group, had a
large contingent in attendance. It was really well
attended, and I had the opportunity to visit
with them during the lunch hour. And that interaction is critical
to the department’s decision making. As you might imagine,
something that is a primary focus of our
eight year construction work plan is adding shoulders
to rural two highways that don’t have shoulders. That initiative benefits not
only the safety of vehicles, but it also adds a safety
aspect for bicyclists that might be riding in those areas. So that investment strategy
is helpful in many cases. Special guests at that meeting
included the lieutenant governor, Matt Pinnell,
and the executive director of the League of American
Bicyclists, Bill Nesper. And, again, I had the
opportunity to visit with them, got some good
feedback, and that was kind of a historically
significant event for the department to have
hosted that type of a meeting. And, lastly, we recently
had a groundbreaking on the Gilcrease Expressway. That project is a partnership
between the Turnpike Authority, the Department of
Transportation, the city of Tulsa,
Tulsa county, INCOG, the metropolitan planning
area there in the Tulsa area, and the Federal
Highway Administration. So we brought a lot
of different partners together to work on a project
that not one individual unit of government could have
got their arms around by themselves. That groundbreaking
was on October 22, and the project there on
the west side of Tulsa is a very, very important
transportation corridor that will connect highway
412 South to Interstate 44 across the Arkansas
River and across a pretty significant floodplain. The construction aspects of the
project are pretty difficult. There are 22 bridge
structures that will have to be constructed
in that five mile segment. Two of those bridge structures–
four if you consider that they’re parallel bridges– are extremely difficult. One
over the Arkansas River, again, and one over a pretty
significant flood area. So another critical step in
transportation investment that was made possible
by leveraging resources across a lot of different
governmental entities, so that’s a really proud
moment for the department to be a part of that, and a
proud moment for the state of Oklahoma, certainly
the Tulsa area, to move forward on a critical
transportation improvement. With that, Mr.
chairman, I would be happy to answer any questions
that the commission may have of me. GENE MCKOWN: Any questions? Thank you. TIM GATZ: Thank you. GENE MCKOWN: Well, is there
any other discussion anyone asked for today? If not, I would propose
a motion for adjournment. TW SHANNON: So moved. JAMES GRIMSLEY: Second. GENE MCKOWN: All in favor? DON FREYMILLER: All
in favor stand up. GENE MCKOWN: Stand up! [LAUGHTER]

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